Maxxx Flair — S.E.I.S. [Chapter 1]

Posted by on February 23, 2014

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I’m all for self-expression, but the extent to which under-and-post-grads have begun chasing down full-time careers in hip-hop is concerning. It seems to signify the misconception that attaining a lucrative presence in the genre comes with ease; you don’t need to know music theory, don’t need to be able to play an instrument, and don’t really even need a good singing voice, though it certainly helps your versatility and is more appealing in this post-So Far Gone era of hip-hop. Thus, for those who like to write and like the idea of stardom and like the idea of feeding their egos, hip-hop seems like a relatively simple and satisfying career aspiration. It helps, too, that this is 2014 and gangsta rap is no longer the forefront of the genre. We’ve reached a time when there is no defined rapper aesthetic, when Sammy Adams is as equally recognizable as an emcee as Bun B. This is all to say that every day bloggers around the country have their inboxes stocked with thoroughly uninspired rap. Rap that at least attempts to replicate the sounds and flows of what already exists on the radio, as if recycling Big Sean’s flow from “All Me” guarantees radio placement.

This is why it’s so exciting to receive a record like S.E.I.S. It’s surprisingly easy when you listen to an album to tell if the artist enjoyed making it, and whether its sound is genuine and authentic. When that is the case, it’s that much more fun to digest, and it doesn’t make you question the artist’s goals. If the passion is there, they’re not only more likely to do the work necessary to become a success to the extent of a Macklemore or Logic or Hoodie Allen — which is really hard — but also that probably doesn’t even matter to them. It’s art, it’s their passion, and the unlikelihood of acceptance shouldn’t hold them back — the same way that the low acceptance rate at top law schools doesn’t keep hopefuls from applying in bulk. Maxxx Flair, an NYC native, was first featured on FNT in 2012 with “Forever Dope”, and while he was already a budding emcee at the time, his progression as a lyricist and technical rapper is immediately made clear from the first few bars of the intro. Fueled by a solid selection of lively, hard-hitting beats, Maxxx shines over this set of seven tracks, showcasing his finesse with cadence, wide range of flows, and strong attention-to-detail as a writer. Accompanying the mixtape is the video for the first single, “[email protected]#K !t”, produced by 52 Kings, which you can find below. If you take a chance on one new rapper this week, let it be him.

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